Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions by Harry H. Heyson

Cover of: Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions | Harry H. Heyson

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in [Washington], Springfield, Va .

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  • Airplanes -- Wings

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StatementHarry H. Heyson, Gregory D. Riebe, and Cynthia L. Fulton.
SeriesNASA technical paper ; 1020, NASA technical paper -- 1020.
ContributionsRiebe, Gregory D., Fulton, Cynthia L., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Scientific and Technical Information Office.
The Physical Object
Pagination73 p. :
Number of Pages73
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15220441M

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Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions This edition published in by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in.

Springfield, Va. Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensionsNational Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office, for sale by the National Technical Information Service.

Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions. Winglet toe-in angle allows design trades between efficiency and root moment. A winglet showed the greatest benefit when the wing loads were heavy near the tip.

Washout diminished the benefit of either tip modification, and the gain in induced Author: C. Fulton, G. Riebe and H. Heyson. Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of.

This study also aims at developing an automated model for different types of winglets and wing tip devices with the help of CAD technology focused on reducing design time during the initial design process. Knowledge based approach is used in this work and all the models are parameterized so each model could be varied with associated parameters.

Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions Harry H. Heyson, G. Riebe, Cynthia L. Fulton Materials Science.

winglet which would effectively give the winglet the correct aerodynamic twist. Thus, no geometric twist would be required. The present research report examines the validity of this hypothesis. Cary (2) used a non-planar lifting surface theory to parametrically study winglet effects.

The trends for drag. Dissertations and Theses Aerodynamic and Structural Design of a Winglet for Enhanced Performance of a Business Jet Nicolas El Haddad Follow this and additional works at: H.H.

Heyson, G.D. Riebe, and C.L. Fulton,“Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions,” NASA Technical Paper R.T. Jones and T.A. Lasinski,“Effects of winglets on the induced drag of ideal wing shapes,” NASA Technical Memorandum   H.H.

Heyson, G.D. Riebe, C.L. FultonTheoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions vol.National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office ().

Winglets are known improve the efficiency of large aircraft at high subsonic speeds, but winglet designs for smaller aircraft such as UAVs are largely unproven. Winglets improve efficiency by diffusing the shed wingtip vortex, which in turn reduces the drag due to lift and improves the wing’s lift over drag ratio.

This research investigates methods for designing and optimizing winglet. Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions. [Washington]: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office ; Springfield, Va.: For sale by the National Technical Information Service, (OCoLC) Material Type.

tip devices. We will not conclude whether winglets or tip extensions are “better”, as this would require a specific and complete aircraft design study. Instead, the results show the importance of various assumptions and design degrees of freedom. First, tip extensions and winglets are compared using nonlinear optimization.

C-wings are then. Heyson H. H., Riebe G. and Fulton C. Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing tip extensions NASA TMX Google Scholar [17].

The two methods of calculation agreed to better than a tenth of a percent. 15 REFERENCES 1. Whit comb, Richard T.: A Design Approach and Selected Wind Tunnel Results at High Subsonic Speeds for Wing Tip Mounted Winglets. NASA TN D, 2. Munk, Max M.: The Minimum Induced Drag of Aerofoils.

NACA TR, J.R. Chambers, Concept to Reality: Contributions of the Langley Research Center to US Civil Aircraft of the s, [6] H.H.

Heyson, G.D. Riebe, C.L. Fulton, Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions, NASA. Heyson HH, Riebe GD, Fulton CL () Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing tip extensions. NASA Tech Paper Hoerner SF () Fluid-dynamic lift, 2nd edn.

Hoerner, Bricktown. It can be thought of the winglets pushing the wing tip vortices out further away from the tip, so that a larger effective span, b eff results affecting th e air mass and 2. EPB2 EPA EPA EPB2 EP B2 EP B2 EP B2 EP A EP A EP A EP A EP A EP A EP B2 EP B2 EP B2 Authority EP European Patent Office Prior art keywords winglet wing chord tip root Prior art date Legal status (The legal status is an.

A reduction of reduced drag through the use of horizontal or vertical wing tip extensions is also discussed. Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-tip.

(Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions - Heyson, - NASA TP ). Studies with constraints on integrated bending moment suggested that the two approaches were almost identical in these respects. (Effect of winglets on the induced drag of ideal wing shapes - Jones, - NASA NASA TM.

The winglet has a tip, just like a wing, so it also produces a tip vortex, albeit a much weaker one. The winglet's tip vortex is located far above the airflow over the wing, thus it has little influence on the airflow over the main wing. Whitcomb said that winglets might be termed "vortex diffusers.".

In Refere a parametric study on the relative advantages of wing-tip extensions and winglets confirms most of the recommendations of Reference 1 and provides addi- tional design information, for a wide range of wings. Winglets are actually little wings that generate lift. And, just like any other wing, they generate lift perpendicular to the relative wind.

If you didn't have wingtip vortices, the winglet would generate lift inward, which isn't very helpful. But, wingtip vortices change the direction of the relative wind at the wingtip.

[3] Heyson H. H., Riebe G. and Fulton C. L., “ Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions,” NASA TR TP, Google Scholar [4] Jones R. and Lasinsky T. A., “ Effects of Winglets on the Induced Drag of Ideal Wing Shapes,” NASA TM, Google Scholar.

Heyson () conducted an experiment to study the advantages of Whitcomb’s winglet. His results indicate that winglets would reduce the induced drag more than tip extensions and would be at its best when they are nearly vertical. Jones and Lasinski () showed using Trefftz-plane theory that the vertical length of a.

The wing tip-transition-winglet panel was simplified to only wing-tip and winglet wing-tip sections, since the winglet position was backwards at most until the front spar location ( c).

Figure 5 shows the top-view geometry of the new planform, following the addition of the winglet, in which Z-height distribution is the vertical height.

Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing-tip extensions / ([Washington]: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Scientific and Technical Information Office ; Springfield, Va. Efficient wing tip devices for use with aircraft wings.

In one embodiment, an aircraft wing/winglet combination includes a wing having a wing root portion and a wing tip portion spaced apart from the wing root portion. The wing tip portion can have a wash-out twist relative to the wing root portion.

The aircraft wing/winglet combination can further include a winglet extending from the wing tip. An experimental investigation of the wake of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) model using flow visualization techniques and a 3D Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) system is presented in this work.

Emphasis is given on the flow field at the wingtip and the investigation of the tip vortices. A comparison of the velocity field is made with and without winglet devices installed at the wingtips. Harry H. Heyson, Gregory D. Riebe and Cynthia L. Fulton, “Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions,” NASA TPP.T.

Reynolds, W. Gersten and Voorhees, C. G., “Gates Learjet Model 28/29, the First "Longhorn Learjet,” AIAA PaperAugust   Thus, in the work presented hereby, the authors have studied the impact of the camber morphing winglet (CMW) on the performance and fuel consumption of a midsize business jet using the morphing device concept developed by Martins and Catalano, to evaluate if the CMW concept could overcome the FGW investigation was done by optimizing winglet sections camber.

"Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions, " NASA-TP, September 7 Zimmer, H., "The Significance of Wing End Configuration in Airfoil Design for Civil Aviation Aircraft, NASA TM, October 8Lundry, J. Whitcomb, R. A Design Approach and Selected Wind-tunnel Results at High Subsonic Speeds for Wing-tip Mounted Winglets.

Hampton, VA: NASA Technical Note D Heyson, H. H., G. Riebe, and C. Fulton. Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions. Hampton, VA: NASA Technical. The purpose of the present study is to examine, both theoretically and experimentally,the possibilityof further increasingthe aerodynamicefficiencyof a biplane configurationby adding winglets.

The first step in the study was to produce experimentaland theoreticaldata for a biplane configuration. Aerodynamics of Wing tips and Winglets. bending moment. While the winglets and wingtip extensions were designed by a combination of available theory and wind tunnel tests, the wing itself was not redesigned.

At the same time, another study done by NASA considered the relative advantages of winglets and wingtip extensions [3]. It concluded that at. A design approach and selected wind tunnel results at high subsonic speeds for wing-tip mounted winglets.

NASA TND, Google Scholar. Heyson, H. H., Riebe, G. D., Fulton, C. Theoretical parametric study of the relative advantages of winglets and wing tip extensions. NASA TMX, Google Scholar.

winglets nowadays, due to their advantages. For older aircraft, winglets are often retrofitted because they are a comparatively cost effective choice when evaluated against other upgrades, such as new engines.

Statement of the Problem Retrofitting winglets to an existing airframe has to be a viable option for a manufacturer. The relative aft-movement of the center of pressure also acts to attenuate flutter. The raked wingtips described in patent ‘ range from moderate span extensions (e.

g., 6% increase in span) to large span extensions (e. g., 12% increase in span). It is the large span extensions that offer the greatest benefits. NASA Technical Paper"Theoretical Parametric Study of the Relative Advantages of Winglets and Wing-Tip Extensions", by Harry H.

Heyson et al., Aviation Week & Space Technology, pp."Dornier Expects Extensive Sensing, Surveillance Demand for DO ", by Michael Feazel, Sep. 9,   Bird wings have been studied as prototypes for wing design since the beginning of aviation.

Although wing tip slots, i.e. wings with distinct gaps between the tip feathers (primaries), are very common in many birds, only a few studies have been conducted on the benefits of tip feathers on the wingʼs performance, and the aerodynamics behind tip feathers remains to be understood.A second observation is the fact, that all winglets hinder the spanwise flow and thus the pressure drop at the wing tip, which is seen in the first configuration, the free wing tip.

The change of the flow pattern close to the tip is also visible in the velocity distributions in a section at 99% of the span, which is shown in an enlarged view below.

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